God & Philosophy

A three part course starting Fall 2021
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Aristotle argued that God exists because reason entails the presence of an unmoved mover, and he was criticized. Ghazali argued that God exists because there had to be a first cause, and was criticized. Descartes argued that God exists because it’s a mathematical imperative, and was criticized. George Berkeley argued that God exists because He’s the mind that can conceive of objects before they are processed into ideas by our sense perception, and was criticized. Kant argued that God exists, not as a result of any hypothesis of analytical reasoning, but because of the moral necessity of His existence, and was criticized. They were followed by Pierce, Whitehead, Gödel, Gardner and others who wove philosophical arguments for God but sustained heavy intellectual casualties in their wake. There isn’t a single thinker, philosopher, theologian, or metaphysicist who laid down a detailed argument for the existence of a supreme being that has not been mauled by the sharp claws of a self-serving brand of atheism. Yet, no metaphysical idea managed to survive the incessant molestation of godlessness than that of a Creator. The assumption that the universe has a Maker has not been committed to the museum of antiquated human thought, despite the constant battery. It’s not a relic of the past, but an instrument of the present. What are we to do with this interminable lust for God?

In this course, we will examine the philosophical systems propounded over the centuries to affirm the idea of God. This is meant to achieve multiple objectives: first, teach students the basics of philosophic thought, philosophical reasoning and logic. Second, to provide armor and shield for Muslim students to effectively respond to arguments against God at school, at the workplace, on social media, and even at home on the dinner table. Last, to show beyond doubt that the idea of God can and must be proven without any resort to theological and dogmatic perspectives. A little clear thinking is enough to lead you to Him.

The course will rely heavily on Imam Azeez’s published work: “The Imam and the Atheist” which examines, in a dramatic dialogue, the trials and tribulations of a community member who’s nephew renounced his faith and became an atheist. The uncle has multiple conversations with an Imam about atheism, in order to “bring” his nephew back to the fold of Islam. Does he succeed? Join us on this exciting journey to learn more!

Required Textbooks: The Imam and the Atheist

Class Dates

Part 1: September 16th - November 18th
Part 2: December 2nd - February 24th
Part 3: March 3rd - May 26th

Course Instructor

Imam Azeez

Imam, writer and advocate for youth work. Imam Azeez served as the religious leader of the SALAM Islamic Center in Sacramento CA for 10 years and is the Founder and the Senior Imam of the Tarbiya Institute. Imam Azeez is educated in Medicine, Political Science, Sociology, Islamic History and Islamic Theology. He holds an MD from Ain Shams University, a BA from Ohio State University, and an MA from the University of Chicago.